Latest Mississippi River Delta News: Sept. 24, 2014

September 24, 2014 | Posted by Ashley Peters in Latest News

Louisiana's coastline is disappearing at the rate of a football field an hour (+audio)
By Adam Wernick, PRI. Sept. 23, 2014.
“Dramatic erosion and sinking land along the southeastern coast of Louisiana…” (read more)

Oil Spill Research Grant Program Up and Running
By The Claims Journal. Sept. 24, 2014.
“The National Academy of…"

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The Beauty of the Louisiana Barrier Islands

September 23, 2014 | Posted by Delta Dispatches in Hurricanes, Meetings/Events, People, Restoration Projects

By Eden Davis, Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign

Baby Pelican on Isles DernieresOn September 12, I had the opportunity to travel to Raccoon Island, one of the remaining barrier islands outside of Terrebonne Bay. Raccoon Island was once part of the 25-mile-long barrier island chain called Isles Dernieres or Last Islands. Prior to the Last Island Hurricane of August 10, 1856, Isles Dernieres was a famous resort destination. When the Last Island Hurricane hit, more than 200 people perished in the storm, and the island was left void of vegetation. The hurricane split the island into five smaller islands called East, Trinity, Whiskey, Raccoon and Wine Islands.

On this beautiful summer day, I traveled by boat with 18 other volunteers and employees from the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries 13 miles off the coast of Cocodrie to Raccoon Island. As we left Terrebonne Bay, we passed several shrimping boats and a distinctly large jack-up rig that was heading offshore. These were distinct reminders that Louisiana’s coast is a working coast that provides our nation with oil and gas and some of the best seafood one can sink its teeth into.

Pelicans Isle DernieresUpon reaching the island, we saw hundreds of pelicans. Many were in the air, some were in the water and others were on the island with their young whom were not yet able to fly. As we trekked to the beach side of the island, there were beautiful moon shells scattering the sand. Our task was to install a one-mile-long sand fence. This involved rolling out sections of the fence, standing it up and nailing it to the already placed fence posts.

The sand fence will help to restore and protect 20 acres of the rapidly eroding shoreline of Raccoon Island. The island chain used to be one large barrier island, but years of erosion from hurricanes compounded with a loss of sediment from the Mississippi River have broken the island into the four that exist today. The remaining islands continue to erode and, without intervention like the sand fence project, may wash away completely over the next several years. The sand fence will directly protect critical nesting habitat for the pelicans and other seabirds that call these islands home. The sand fence will also help to mitigate erosion.

Isle Dernieres Sand Fence Building IBarrier islands are our communities’ first line of defense. Storm surge during a hurricane will hit these islands before it hits our marshes and communities. Barrier islands are beautiful, but they are on the front lines of sea level rise and subsidence. If we fail to restore them, our grandchildren may never see their splendor. Moreover, the birds that call these islands home will be forced out of their habitat.

Brown pelicans, the island’s primary residents and our state bird, are at great risk if these islands succumb to the Gulf’s waters. Brown pelicans do not migrate. They stay in the mangroves, the beaches and the shores. As the Louisiana coast sinks into the Gulf, the critical habitat for these beautiful birds is threatened.

Sand Fence Isle DernieresIf you have a Friday or Saturday free, consider volunteering with the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana. They have regular marsh grass plantings, dune restoration projects and other ecosystem protection and restoration projects available for volunteers. Not only will you enjoy a beautiful day outdoors, but you will also be directly restoring and protecting our coast. Check out the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana’s event calendar here: https://www.thedatabank.com/dpg/316/mtglist.asp?formid=event&caldate=9-1-2014#mtgsrchfrm.

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Latest Mississippi River Delta News: Sept. 23, 2014

September 23, 2014 | Posted by Ashley Peters in Latest News

Search narrows for firms to provide proposals to restore Louisiana coast
By Bob Marshall, The Lens. Sept. 22, 2014.
“Louisiana has narrowed its worldwide search for help in solving its coastal crisis…” (read more)

Despite land loss, Native American community clings to life along the Mississippi River
By John Snell, WAFB. Sept…."

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Latest Mississippi River Delta News: Sept. 19, 2014

September 22, 2014 | Posted by Ashley Peters in Latest News

CITGO "cares for our coast" with dune restoration event at Holly Beach (+video)
By Monica Grimaldo, KPLC (Lake Charles, La.). Sept. 21, 2014.
“CITGO continued "Caring for Our Coast" and partnered with the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana…” (read more)

CITGO Commemorates Ninth Anniversary Of Hurricane Rita; Leads Local Volunteers In…"

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Latest Mississippi River Delta News: Sept. 19, 2014

September 19, 2014 | Posted by Ashley Peters in Latest News

Morganza Control Structure Procedures Proposed
By Dredging Today. Sept. 18, 2014.
“Beginning next week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District…” (read more)

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