Archive for Media Resources


NEWS RELEASE: Louisiana Governor Cuts Coastal Funds, Jeopardizing Coast

January 22, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in Economy, Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Lauren Bourg, National Audubon Society, 225.776.9838, lbourg@audubon.org
Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225.767.4181, jimmy.frederick@crcl.org

Louisiana Governor Cuts Coastal Funds, Jeopardizing Coast

Budget cuts will impact restoration programs and raises question of how state will pay for Coastal Plan

(New Orleans – January 21, 2015) On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal announced budget cuts including cuts to Louisiana coastal programs and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Agency (CPRA).

National and local conservation organizations committed to coastal Louisiana restoration – Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana  issued the following statement in response to announced budget cuts:

“In 2012 the Governor and legislature of the State of Louisiana embarked upon a fifty-year, $50 billion effort to avert a disaster for more than two million of our coastal citizens.  To date the state has managed to shield the agency leading that effort, CPRA, from budgetary politics. CPRA manages hundreds of millions of dollars in levee and restoration construction projects each year and is run on a small budget entirely supported by mineral revenues—nothing from the taxpayer-supported general fund.

“Clearly, Louisiana is facing a short term budgetary crisis, but CPRA is tackling a much more serious long- term crisis. If we lose the fight against the forces of coastal erosion, we lose our homes, our coastal towns and cities, our jobs, and we devastate our local and national economy. We are in the very early stages of developing the long-term strategies we’ll need to fund the plan—and we have a long way to go. In the meantime, cutting CPRA’s restoration and protection program support is short-sighted and ill-advised.

“Louisiana’s coastal region is an economic driver for the state and the front lines in protecting our state from storms and the encroaching Gulf of Mexico. Today’s budget cuts diminish the CPRA’s ability to do its job, putting communities at risk and slowing down restoration efforts.  These cuts are an unfortunate attempt to hastily balance a budget while potentially having lasting impacts on our coastal economy and safety of coastal residents.

“As the state begins to implement a fifty-year, $50 billion coastal master plan, now is not the time to be cutting funds from the coastal program. On the contrary, the governor and legislature should instead be laying out a vision for what new sources of funding will pay for this critical plan.

We look forward to working with this governor and future governors to protect our coast and develop new, long-term funding sources that can be used to implement the state’s coastal master plan.”

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Interview Opportunities: Interview opportunities are available with experts in coastal restoration and budget issues from our national and local conservation organizations.

Mississippi River Delta Restoration Experts:
David Muth, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Douglas J. Meffert, D. Env., MBA, Executive Director, National Audubon Society (Audubon Louisiana)
Kimberly Reyher, Executive Director, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana
Steve Cochran, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund

 

 

 

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Final Phase of BP Oil Spill Trial to Begin Next Week

January 15, 2015 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Birds, BP Oil Disaster, Clean Water Act, Media Resources, RESTORE Act, Science, Seafood, Wildlife

Press Statement + Interview Opportunities Available

Contact:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Lauren Bourg, National Audubon Society, 225.776.9838, lbourg@audubon.org

Final Phase of BP Oil Spill Trial to Begin Next Week

BP must be held fully accountable for its role in nation’s largest oil disaster

(New Orleans – January 15, 2015) On Tuesday, January 20, 2015, the third and final phase of the BP oil spill civil trial will begin in New Orleans. This concluding portion of the trial will determine how much BP will be required to pay in Clean Water Act fines for its role in the 2010 Gulf oil disaster.

National and local conservation organizations committed to Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast restoration – Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation – issued the following statement in advance of Tuesday’s proceedings:

“Nearly five years after the oil disaster, the people and wildlife of the Gulf Coast still wait for justice. For 87 days, BP dumped more than 200 million gallons of oil into our Gulf, contaminating our marshes and beaches and jeopardizing wildlife ranging from brown pelicans to sperm whales. But the oil giant has yet to take full responsibility. BP has dragged out litigation in the courts, challenging every decision only to have each decision against them confirmed by higher courts.

“Despite claims that it would ‘make it right’ in the Gulf, BP has, for the past five years, waged a public relations war focused on blaming everyone else and denying sound scientific research showing ongoing impacts from the oil disaster. The effects of the oil spill are far from over and may not be fully known for years, or even decades, to come.

“Now the court has the opportunity and responsibility to make it right, to hold BP fully accountable for the damage done to the Gulf and to assign the maximum penalty to BP for its gross negligence. The outcome from this decision must send a clear and powerful signal to every other operator in the Gulf: deep-sea drilling is risky business, and they must protect their employees, our communities and our ecosystems. BP chose not to do that, so they deserve to pay the maximum fines allowed by law.

“Through the RESTORE Act of 2012, Congress paved the way for the Gulf’s recovery by ensuring that 80 percent of the Clean Water Act fines BP will pay will be reinvested into Gulf Coast restoration. But that restoration can’t begin until this case is resolved and the legal wrangling ends – and BP remains the principle barrier to much-needed funding going to vital restoration projects.

“Holding BP fully accountable for the 2010 Gulf oil disaster is the fair and right thing to do for the Gulf’s ecosystems and economies. We are hoping, after five long years, that justice is close. The Gulf has waited long enough.”

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Interview Opportunities: Interview opportunities are available with experts in science, policy, wildlife and restoration issues from our national and local conservation organizations.

Mississippi River Delta Restoration Experts:
David Muth, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Douglas J. Meffert, D. Env., MBA, Executive Director, National Audubon Society (Audubon Louisiana)
Steve Cochran, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund

Science:
John A. Lopez, Ph.D., Coastal Scientist, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation
Alisha Renfro, Ph.D., Coastal Scientist, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Natalie Peyronnin, Director of Science Policy, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund

Policy:
Courtney Taylor, Policy Director, Ecosystems Program, Environmental Defense Fund

Background:
Since the BP oil disaster began nearly five years ago, ongoing findings deliver truths omitted by BP’s ads: the oil disaster’s negative effects are increasingly clear, present and far from resolved. Over the past year alone, new research has surfaced:

  • An October 2014 study showed that the Gulf oil disaster left an “oily bathtub ring” the size of Rhode Island on the sea floor.
  • A study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) detailed how exposure to BP oil can lead to abnormalities including irregular heartbeats and heart attacks in Atlantic bluefin tuna and amberjack.
  • A NOAA study revealed that dolphins exposed to BP oil had increased health problems, including adrenal problems, severe lung disease and reproductive issues.
  • A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences definitively linked a community of damaged deep water corals near the Macondo well to the BP oil spill.
  • A Louisiana State University researcher found that the BP oil spill is still killing Louisiana coastal insects.
  • Visible tar balls and tar mats continue to surface, including a 40,000-pound tar mat discovered off the coast of a Louisiana barrier island in June 2013, three years after the start of the oil spill.
  • An infographic depicts ongoing impacts of the Gulf oil disaster.
Deepwater Horizon rig explosion

2010 Deepwater Horizon rig explosion.

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NEWS RELEASE: Conservation Groups Release Restoration Solutions for Mississippi River Delta

December 9, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in BP Oil Disaster, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, Media Resources, Reports, Restoration Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Lauren Bourg, National Audubon Society, 225.776.9838, lbourg@audubon.org

Conservation Groups Release Restoration Solutions for Mississippi River Delta
New report recommends a series of science-based restoration efforts to benefit coastal Louisiana

(NEW ORLEANS – December 9, 2014) Today, leading national and local conservation groups released a report outlining 19 priority projects for restoring the Mississippi River Delta following the 2010 Gulf oil disaster.

Restoring the Mississippi River Delta for People and Wildlife: Recommended Projects and Priorities was jointly authored by conservation groups working together on Mississippi River Delta restoration – Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – and describes a suite of restoration projects that would collectively reverse wetlands loss and help protect New Orleans and other coastal communities from storms. The project recommendations include sediment diversions, freshwater diversions, marsh creation, barrier island reconstruction, ridge restoration, shoreline protection and hydrological modifications. The proposed project solutions can work in tandem to not only build but also sustain new wetlands along Louisiana’s coast.

The report is aimed at informing a series of decisions that will be ultimately made for funds flowing from the Gulf oil disaster, including those to be made by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (Council). The federal-state Council is tasked with implementing a comprehensive restoration plan to include a list of projects prioritized for their impact on the Gulf ecosystem. The Council recently released a list of projects and programs proposed for funding with oil spill penalty money.

“The Mississippi River Delta was ground zero for the Gulf oil disaster,” said David Muth, National Wildlife Federation’s director of Gulf restoration. “These project recommendations, if selected and implemented efficiently, could begin in earnest the wholesale restoration of one of the most ecologically and economically important areas in the entire country. The health of the Mississippi River Delta is a cornerstone for the health of the entire Gulf Coast. ”

“We have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to get this right and start real restoration along the Gulf Coast,” said Doug Meffert, executive director and vice president of Audubon Louisiana. “Our recommendations present a full suite of restoration solutions that work in concert, providing complementary benefits and sustaining one other. We hope the Council will select restoration projects like these, which are scientifically shown to provide the maximum benefit to the entire Gulf ecosystem.”

“By combining different types of projects in the same geographic area – for example, sediment diversions, marsh creation and barrier island restoration – we can build new land quickly and sustain it for the long term,” said Natalie Peyronnin, director of Science Policy for Environmental Defense Fund’s Mississippi River Delta Restoration Program. “This comprehensive approach to restoration is much more effective than using a band-aid approach. We must get restoration right – and get it started now – for the communities, wildlife and economies of the Gulf.”

“The oil spill affected wildlife and ecosystems across the Gulf Coast, and we need to make smart decisions about how to use this money to improve the health of the entire system,” said Muth. “We owe it to future generations to determine where this money can have the greatest impact and to focus our efforts there.”

The oil disaster sent roughly 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Louisiana’s coastline received the largest amount of oil and was suffering one of the fastest rates of wetlands loss in the world even prior to the spill. BP and the other companies responsible will ultimately pay billions of dollars in penalties and punitive damages, much of which will be allocated to the Gulf states for restoration.

For a full description of the 19 projects, visit http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/files/2014/12/Restoring-the-Mississippi-River-Delta-for-People-and-Wildlife.pdf

For a full description of the 19 projects, push here.

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Please contact Emily Guidry Schatzel, schatzele@nwf.org, for a recording of the telepress conference.

The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Composed of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. A map of the projects and descriptions are available for download at www.mississippiriverdelta.org/map.

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Media Advisory: Conservation Groups Release Priority Restoration Solutions for Louisiana and Gulf Coast

December 3, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Media Resources, Meetings/Events

MEDIA ADVISORY for Tuesday Dec. 9
Louisiana telepresser – 10 am CT
Gulf-wide telepresser – 11 am CT

Conservation Groups Release Priority Restoration Solutions for Louisiana and Gulf Coast
Two new reports outline path toward comprehensive Gulf Coast ecosystem restoration following oil disaster

The 2010 Gulf oil disaster dumped more than 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, affecting hundreds of miles of coastline along the five Gulf states, with Louisiana's coast receiving the greatest damage. BP and the other companies responsible will pay billions of dollars in penalties and punitive damages, much of which will be allocated to the Gulf states for restoration.

In two new complementary reports, leading conservation organizations make specific recommendations for how penalty money can best be spent to improve the health of the Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast, for the benefit of people, wildlife and the national economy. Speakers on the call will also be able to comment on the recently-released Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council’s list of proposed projects.

Louisiana

WHAT: Restoring the Mississippi River Delta for People and Wildlife: Recommended Projects and Priorities – A report by the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition describes in detail 19 restoration projects aimed at stopping wetlands loss and restoring habitat in the Mississippi River Delta.

SPEAKERS:
David Muth, Gulf Program Director, National Wildlife Federation
Natalie Peyronnin, Director of Science Policy, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund
Dr. Doug Meffert, Vice President and Executive Director, Audubon Louisiana

WHEN: Tuesday, December 9, 2014, 10:00 am CT

DIAL: 1-800-791-2345, code 69498

Gulf Coast

WHAT: Restoring the Gulf of Mexico for People and Wildlife: Recommended Projects and Priorities – A report by the National Wildlife Federation describes restoration projects and priorities for all five Gulf states: Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.

SPEAKERS:
David Muth, Gulf Program Director, National Wildlife Federation
Ryan Fikes, Gulf of Mexico Staff Scientist, National Wildlife Federation

WHEN: Tuesday, December 9, 2014, 11:00 am CT

DIAL: 1-800-791-2345, code 68545

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Lacey McCormick, National Wildlife Federation, 512.610.7765, mccormick@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org

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The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Composed of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

National Wildlife Federation is America’s largest conservation organization inspiring people to protect wildlife for our children’s future. www.nwf.org.

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Conservation Organizations Respond to RESTORE Council Release of Gulf Coast Restoration Project Proposals

December 1, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Media Resources, Restoration Projects, RESTORE Act

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS: Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Lauren Bourg, National Audubon Society, 504.264.6862, lbourg@audubon.org

Conservation Organizations Respond to RESTORE Council Release of Gulf Coast Restoration Project Proposals
Council should select projects that provide maximum benefit to Gulf Coast ecosystem

(New Orleans—December 1, 2014) Today, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (Council) released its list of project and program proposals to be considered for funding with select penalty money from the 2010 Gulf oil disaster. Council members, representing each of the five Gulf states and six federal agencies, were allowed to submit up to five proposals each for consideration by the Council. National and local conservation organizations committed to Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast restoration – Environmental Defense FundNational Wildlife FederationNational Audubon SocietyLake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – issued the following statement:

“Now the focus shifts to the decision-making processes of the RESTORE Council.

“As laid out in the RESTORE Act, this is the only portion of RESTORE funds that is specifically required to be spent without regard for state borders and instead for the good of the Gulf. That makes it essential for the Council to ultimately select restoration projects that provide the maximum benefit to the entire Gulf Coast ecosystem. Projects that work together – providing complementary benefits and sustaining one another – will produce the most robust restoration possible with available funds. To achieve that, we encourage the Council to conduct a comprehensive science-based evaluation, including a ranking of the proposals, using the best science available when selecting projects for funding.

“While this round of funding is only a fraction of the total resources that will become available for Gulf Coast restoration, it is imperative that any projects selected work in tandem to provide the biggest bang for our buck. More than four years after the oil disaster, the wildlife, communities and unique habitats of the Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast cannot wait any longer for restoration to begin and deserve nothing less than our best efforts, efficient spending of available funding and science-based project selection. This is the RESTORE Council’s best chance to get it right from the start.”

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The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Composed of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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New Website Tracks Impacts of Coastal Restoration On Businesses and the Gulf Economy

September 18, 2014 | Posted by Ryan Rastegar in Economy, Media Resources

Visit OurCoastOurEconomy.org

This post originally appeared on the website OurCoastOurEconomy.org.

Environmental Defense Fund today launched a new business-focused website, OurCoastOurEconomy.org, which provides comprehensive information and data on the direct links between Louisiana coastal restoration and the survival and growth of business sectors in the state, Gulf region and nation.

The website offers resources on the economics of restoration, policy updates on the RESTORE Act and other restoration funding, a map of businesses poised to grow with increased funding for coastal restoration, news updates and reports.

Who would find this website helpful?

  • Business leaders who care about making sure RESTORE monies get spent as intended.
  • Policymakers interested in the types and locations of business that will benefit from restoration.
  • Reporters following the RESTORE Act and covering why it matters to businesses.

If you are a supporter and advocate of coastal restoration, you will find this site useful for messaging and talking points. Be sure to check out the news section where, for instance, you can learn that the long-awaited Treasury regulations for the RESTORE Act have recently been issued and that an important new ruling has been issued in the BP oil spill trial. If you are a business involved in coastal restoration, you will find out about important tools like the state's Hot List, which tracks the status on current projects and projects under development.

What will you find?

The site contains many useful resources – in plain English – about the crisis of coastal land loss in Louisiana, what's happening with implementation of the federal RESTORE Act and the status of related funding streams available for Louisiana coastal restoration. For example, site visitors may be interested in:

How can you help?

We always need business leaders willing to speak out in support of restoration, be available for media interviews, write letters to the editor or participate in key meetings. If you want to help, we can loop you into what's happening. Contact us or sign up for monthly updates.

You can also help by telling others about this new website by:

  • Emailing a link to your network and business contacts
  • Sample tweet:

Coastal land loss is not only bad for the environment — it's bad for the economy. To learn more, visit www.ourcoastoureconomy.org

  • Sample Facebook post:

Coastal wetlands in Louisiana are disappearing at the rate of a football field of land every hour. This land loss threatens our communities as well as thousands of businesses and jobs along the Gulf Coast. To learn more about what can be done, visit www.ourcoastoureconomy.org.

If you are a business, please cruise around the site and let us know if it's helpful, or what would make it more useful for your business purposes. To contribute content or get more information, contactjwyerman@edf.org.

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Conservation Groups React to Ruling that BP Grossly Negligent in 2010 Oil Disaster

September 4, 2014 | Posted by Ryan Rastegar in BP Oil Disaster, Clean Water Act, Latest News, Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Skree,
Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Erin Greeson,
National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org

Conservation Groups React to Ruling that BP Grossly Negligent

in 2010 Oil Disaster

Today’s ruling a vital step toward holding BP accountable, restoring the Gulf

(September 4, 2014 – New Orleans) National and local organizations working on Mississippi River Delta restoration – Environmental Defense FundNational Wildlife FederationNational Audubon Society and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation – released the following statement:

“More than 4 years after the BP oil disaster, today’s ruling brings hope and justice for the people, wildlife and ecosystems of Louisiana and the Gulf Coast. For 87 days, the Deepwater Horizon well spewed more than 4.1 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico – because of BP’s egregious conduct. A court of law has confirmed that risky and reckless behavior has consequences. The areas most damaged by the spill cannot wait any longer for restoration to begin. Today’s ruling is a vital step toward holding BP and other parties responsible for the largest oil spill in our nation’s history.”

Protesters gather on the first day of the BP trial in February 2013. Photo credit: Reuters

Protesters gather on the first day of the BP trial in February 2013. Photo credit: Reuters

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Risk and Resilience: Society of Environmental Journalists hosts annual conference this week in New Orleans

| Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in BP Oil Disaster, Community Resiliency, Hurricane Isaac, Hurricane Katrina, Hurricanes, Media Resources, Meetings/Events

By Elizabeth Skree, Communications Manager, Environmental Defense Fund

This week, along the Mississippi River at the Hilton Riverside in New Orleans, hundreds of environmental journalists, reporters and bloggers; journalism students and professors; communications professionals; and NGO and government expert presenters and panelists are gathering for the annual Society of Environmental Journalists Conference. The conference brings together environmental journalists from around the world to learn about emerging environmental issues, meet new sources and experts, learn about new tools and programs, network and socialize.SEJ poster

The theme of this year’s conference is “Risk and Resilience,” and there is no better place to discuss these issues than the Mississippi River Delta. Nine years after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and six years after Hurricanes Gustav and Ike, it is impressive how much of the region has recovered. But while many areas have been revitalized, there are just as many areas that are still rebuilding. Recent climate reports indicate that coastal cities like New Orleans can expect to see more intense storms in the years to come, amplifying the need for increased storm protection. In 2010, the Gulf oil disaster delivered yet another blow to Louisiana’s coast. Even now, the full effects of the spill are unknown, and oil continues to wash up on shore.

On top of it all, Louisiana’s coastal wetlands, a first line of defense against storms, have been vanishing at a staggering rate: Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost nearly 1,900 square miles of land. That’s like the state of Delaware disappearing into the ocean. These wetlands help protect cities, communities and infrastructure by lessening the effects of storm surge. But every hour, Louisiana loses another football field of land, putting the region at increased risk.

But there is hope for recovery and the creation of a restored, resilient Mississippi River Delta. Plans are in place to rebuild coastal wetlands, which will in turn help fortify the coast and cities like New Orleans, provide vital habitat for wildlife and migratory birds, create new jobs and protect existing industries and provide a myriad of other ecological and economic benefits to not only Louisiana, but the entire Gulf Coast.

Staff members from the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign will be at this week’s conference serving as tour guides, panelists and exhibitors. They will be available to answer questions about Louisiana’s land loss crisis, the Gulf oil disaster, solutions for restoring the Mississippi River Delta and other environmental issues facing the region. You can find campaign experts on the following field trips and panels:

Thursday field trips:

Louisiana’s Great Lakes, Cypress Swamps and Woodpeckers

  • Alisha Renfro, Staff Scientist, National Wildlife Federation
  • John Lopez, Executive Director and Senior Scientist, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation
  • Melanie Driscoll, Director of Bird Conservation, Gulf Coast/Mississippi Flyway, National Audubon Society

Oyster Reefs and Fisheries in the Aftermath of BP and Katrina

  • David Muth, Director, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation

The Long Road Home: Community Resilience, Adaptations, and Legacies From America’s Biggest Rebuild

  • Amanda Moore, Deputy Director, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation

Friday panels:

 “The Globe: Feeding Eight Billion People in a Warming World”

  • Rebecca Shaw, Associate Vice President of Ecosystems and Senior Lead Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund

“Oceans and Coasts: The BP Spill’s Untold Ecological Toll”

  • Natalie Peyronnin, Director of Science Policy, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund

The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign will also be cohosting a hospitality reception with The Walton Family Foundation Thursday evening from 5:00-9:00pm. Stop by and meet our campaign’s experts and learn more about our work restoring Louisiana’s coast.

We will also have an exhibit booth Friday and Saturday, stop by and pick up materials, hear about our programs and projects and meet some of our staff.

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New study of storm and flooding mitigation recommendations released today

August 27, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org

New study of storm and flooding mitigation recommendations released today

As Katrina anniversary nears, conservation groups share study of ‘nonstructural measures’

(August 27, 2014 – New Orleans) As Hurricane Katrina’s ninth anniversary approaches this week, a new study released today provides key recommendations to assist coastal residents and businesses in building safe and more resilient communities.

The report, entitled “Achieving Resilience in Coastal Communities: Resources and Recommendations,” is the culmination of a year-long study of coastal Louisiana’s tools, projects and attitudes toward “nonstructural measures” that can mitigate flood risk and reduce the impacts of storm surge. Nonstructural measures include a wide array of activities, including evacuation, home elevation, flood proofing of buildings, flood insurance, planning and zoning and storm proofing critical public facilities. The study was sponsored by National Wildlife Federation as part of the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition and was conducted and led by Dr. Alessandra Jerolleman, executive director for the National Hazard Mitigation Association.

“This is one of the most comprehensive studies to date on nonstructural measures and will greatly benefit not only Louisiana’s coastal communities, but also coastal areas across the country in their preparation for future storms and floodwaters,” said Dr. Jerolleman. “With disasters like Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy wreaking havoc on coastal communities and costing national and local economies billions of dollars, implementing nonstructural measures can make a substantial difference by reducing the impacts of storm surge and flooding.”

The report includes an introduction to nonstructural measures and the status of implementing the measures in Louisiana to mitigate coastal flooding as well as the impacts nonstructural measures have on local emergency planning efforts. It also provides residents, businesses and local communities with best practices based on national case studies that highlight successful implementation of nonstructural measures with an emphasis on creating resilient communities for the future.

“Our coastal communities are so important for regional and national economies,” said Maura Wood, senior partnership manager for National Wildlife Federation, who worked on the report. “Building and maintaining resilient communities takes collaboration and cooperation at all levels. This report gives examples of how residents and governments have worked together to make communities resilient. The Katrina anniversary reminds us that nonstructural measures are a proven and important part of making coastal residents safer.”

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WHO WE ARE: The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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You’re invited: Join experts to talk about cost of restoring Louisiana's coast and who will pay

August 18, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in 2012 Coastal Master Plan, Media Resources, Meetings/Events

The Lens, with sponsorship from the Mississippi River Delta Restoration Coalition, is hosting a panel discussion on the financing of Louisiana's $50-billion Coastal Master Plan at Loyola University this Wednesday, Aug. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m.

This event is designed to send the audience home with a solid understanding of how to restore our coast. An example of questions The Lens plans to address include the following:

  1. How far can we go on the current master plan with the funding in place as well as future funding the state believes it can count on?
  2. What will happen to the scope of the master plan, and the coast, if we don’t secure funding sources beyond that date?
  3. What are the chances Congress will step up in the next decade and provide substantial funding?
  4. What are alternative sources of money?
  5. What can you do to help with this challenge?

Who:

When:

  • Wednesday, Aug. 20
  • 6 to 8 p.m.

Where: Loyola University, Miller Hall 114

Questions: amueller@TheLensNola.org or (504) 258-1624

Light refreshments will be served.

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