Archive for Media Resources


You’re invited: Join experts to talk about cost of restoring Louisiana's coast and who will pay

August 18, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in 2012 Coastal Master Plan, Media Resources, Meetings/Events

The Lens, with sponsorship from the Mississippi River Delta Restoration Coalition, is hosting a panel discussion on the financing of Louisiana's $50-billion Coastal Master Plan at Loyola University this Wednesday, Aug. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m.

This event is designed to send the audience home with a solid understanding of how to restore our coast. An example of questions The Lens plans to address include the following:

  1. How far can we go on the current master plan with the funding in place as well as future funding the state believes it can count on?
  2. What will happen to the scope of the master plan, and the coast, if we don’t secure funding sources beyond that date?
  3. What are the chances Congress will step up in the next decade and provide substantial funding?
  4. What are alternative sources of money?
  5. What can you do to help with this challenge?

Who:

When:

  • Wednesday, Aug. 20
  • 6 to 8 p.m.

Where: Loyola University, Miller Hall 114

Questions: amueller@TheLensNola.org or (504) 258-1624

Light refreshments will be served.

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Groups Praise Release of Gulf Restoration Guidelines

August 13, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org 

Groups Praise Release of Gulf Restoration Guidelines

“Today’s regulations are a vital step forward on the long road to restoring the Mississippi River Delta”

(August 13, 2014—Washington, DC) This morning, the Treasury Department released an Interim Final Rule describing how RESTORE Act funds can be spent.

The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign – a coalition of Environmental Defense FundNational Wildlife FederationNational Audubon SocietyLake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – issued the following statement:

“Today’s regulations are a vital step forward on the long road to restoring the Gulf Coast and the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana, which was ground zero for the 2010 oil disaster. We thank the Treasury Department for preserving the RESTORE Act’s intended purpose to restore damaged ecosystems.

“The Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana is a cornerstone for the ecological and economic well-being of the entire northern Gulf. But Louisiana is losing a football field of land every hour – a land loss crisis that was further exacerbated by the oil spill. All along the Gulf Coast, environmental restoration is urgently needed. There is no time to lose, especially in the delta.

“We hope this rule will provide the RESTORE Council and the state of Louisiana with the information needed to expedite progress to develop a funded project list and restore our coast. Our communities, wildlife and local economies depend on comprehensive ecosystem restoration so they can be enjoyed for generations to come.”

Background:

The RESTORE Act sends 80 percent of all Clean Water Act fines resulting from the 2010 Gulf oil disaster back to the Gulf states to use for restoration. Once these regulations from the Treasury Department are finalized, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council will be able to access $800 million from the Transocean settlement.

BP and other parties responsible for the oil spill face as much as $4,300 per barrel in Clean Water Act fines. The ongoing trial is set to resume in January 2015.

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For Immediate Release: Groups Echo Urgency for Gulf Restoration

July 29, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Lacey McCormick, National Wildlife Federation, 512.610.7765, mccormick@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org
Andrew Blejwas, The Nature Conservancy, 617.785.7047, ablejwas@tnc.org
John Wark, Ocean Conservancy, 850.321.6490, johntwark@gmail.com
Mary Babic, Oxfam America, 617.517.9475, mbabic@oxfamamerica.org

GROUPS ECHO URGENCY FOR GULF RESTORATION

Senators urge Council to accelerate restoration projects  

(Washington, D.C. – July 29, 2014) Following a hearing this morning in the Senate Commerce Committee, groups working on environmental and economic restoration in the Gulf issued the following statement:

“The communities and ecosystems of the Gulf have waited long enough for meaningful restoration. Next year we mark the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the fifth anniversary of the start of the oil spill.

“We appreciate the oversight by the Senate Commerce Committee and Gulf Coast Senators and agree with the major points echoed by Sens. Landrieu, Nelson, Rubio, Vitter, Wicker and Boxer, on the RESTORE Act. First, the Senators made clear that they expect the RESTORE Council to follow the statute’s clear direction to use its allocation – also known as Pot Two – to restore the Gulf ecosystem and not stray from that focus. Second, the Senators and witnesses also stressed the need to speed up the pace to get money on the ground to start moving forward with Gulf restoration.

“We look forward to continue working with the RESTORE Council to get money on the ground for meaningful restoration.”

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Bill to Protect Louisiana’s Coastal Fund Passes House

May 5, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in BP Oil Disaster, Media Resources, State Legislature

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org

Bill to protect Louisiana’s Coastal Fund passes House

Legislation to prevent misuse of Fund moves to Senate 

(May 5, 2014—Baton Rouge, LA) Today, the Louisiana House of Representatives unanimously passed House Bill 490, legislation that will protect the state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Fund from misuse. National and local conservation organizations committed to Mississippi River Delta restoration – Environmental Defense FundNational Wildlife FederationNational Audubon SocietyLake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – issued the following statement:

“The House took a stand for the coast today by unanimously approving House Bill 490. This bill closes the loophole on misuse of the Coastal Fund as a pass-through account. Authored by Representative Brett Geymann (R-Lake Charles), House Bill 490 protects the integrity of the Coastal Fund by ensuring it is used as the law intended: for coastal protection and restoration uses only.

“Transparent and proper use of the Coastal Fund is essential to our state’s coastal restoration efforts. This is especially true as federal decision-makers are deciding how to direct hundreds of millions of dollars in penalties from the Gulf oil disaster. Money transferred into the Coastal Fund should only be used for coastal purposes – not to balance the state’s budget.

“The people of Louisiana deserve the state’s unanimously-passed commitment to comprehensive coastal restoration. We look to the Senate to make the same choice and swiftly pass House Bill 490.”

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The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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Gulf Oil Disaster’s Impacts to Wildlife and Habitat Still Unaddressed Four Years Later

April 17, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in BP Oil Disaster, Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org

Gulf Oil Disaster’s Impacts to Wildlife and Habitat Still Unaddressed Four Years Later

Leading Conservation Groups Highlight New Findings, Need for Restoration

(New Orleans, LA—April 17, 2014) Four years after the Gulf oil disaster began, killing 11 men and spewing 4.1 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, leading national and local conservation organizations working on Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast restoration – Environmental Defense FundNational Audubon SocietyNational Wildlife FederationCoalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation – released the following statement:

“Four years after the worst oil spill in U.S. history, Gulf recovery remains elusive. We must hope for a measure of justice for communities, wildlife and habitats. However, the urgent need for restoration is still unfulfilled.

“Reports from the field and laboratory continue to raise the alarm. New scientific studies show how the oil disaster’s impacts are permeating the food chain – from small microorganisms like zooplankton to large mammals like sperm whales and dolphins. Louisiana wetlands suffocated by BP’s oil have eroded more quickly than those the oil spared. Areas that once provided valuable mangrove habitat for thousands of nesting birds and other animals have shrunk or disappeared. Islands that were thriving rookeries for birds and wildlife are now gray and lifeless. The stark truth of visible damage in areas like Barataria Bay, Louisiana, speaks for itself. This week, BP declared active clean up complete in Louisiana, but volumes of BP oil continue to surface, from miles of oiled coastline to a monster-sized 40,000-pound tar mat.

“While BP denies clear science, the facts present the truth: the Gulf is still hurting, and BP’s to blame. Four years after the largest oil spill in U.S. history, the oil giant has yet to pay a penny of its Clean Water Act fines for polluting the Gulf.

“Restoration of the Mississippi River Delta ecosystem must happen to repair natural resources on which local economies depend. Solutions are ready and within reach. But restoration work cannot begin in earnest until BP is held accountable to the full extent of the law. We urge swift resolution to this crisis. It is past-due and justice demands it.”

Background:

Since the BP oil disaster began four years ago, ongoing findings deliver truths omitted by BP’s ads: the oil disaster’s negative effects are increasingly clear, present and far from resolved. Over the past year alone, new research has surfaced:

  • A new infographic depicts ongoing impacts of the Gulf oil disaster four years later.
  • A study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) detailed how exposure to BP oil can lead to abnormalities including irregular heartbeats and heart attacks in Atlantic bluefin tuna and amberjack.
  • A new NOAA study revealed that dolphins exposed to BP oil had increased health problems, including adrenal problems, severe lung disease and reproductive issues.
  • A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences definitively linked a community of damaged deep water corals near the Macondo well to the BP oil spill.
  • A Louisiana State University researcher found that the BP oil spill is still killing Louisiana coastal insects.
  • Visible tar balls and tar mats continue to surface, including a 40,000-pound tar mat discovered off the coast of a Louisiana barrier island in June 2013.

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WHO WE ARE: The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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Media Advisory: The Gulf Oil Disaster: Four Years Later, Visit Oiled Wetlands & Restoration Sites

April 1, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in Media Resources

Media Advisory for Thursday, April 10, 2014

The Gulf Oil Disaster: Four Years Later, Visit Oiled Wetlands & Restoration Sites

Interview and Boat Trip Opportunities

Contact:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org

As the fourth memorial of the 2010 Gulf oil disaster approaches, join experts from the Mississippi River Delta Restoration CoalitionEnvironmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation – on boat trips in the Louisiana marsh for an on-the-ground view of wildlife and habitat four years post-spill. Visit coastal wetlands that still contain visible BP oil and explore restoration projects that could be funded with oil spill fines.

When the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, killing 11 men and dumping 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf, the impacts of the disaster to wildlife and habitat were felt all along the Gulf Coast. Coastal wetlands around the Mississippi River Delta bore the brunt of the oil as it reached shore, affecting both the environment and the economy of Louisiana and the entire Gulf region that depends on the delta.

The long-term effects of the oil disaster may not be fully known for years or even decades to come, but new research released this year has revealed enduring impacts to many species, including Atlantic bluefin tuna, dolphins, sea turtles, seaside sparrows and others. Hear more about current and potential future consequences of the disaster with experts in science, wildlife and restoration.

To participate in the boat trips, you must RSVP to Emily Guidry Schatzel by Monday, April 7 at 225.253.9781. Boats will be leaving from Myrtle Grove Marina — a 45-minute drive from New Orleans.

Boat Trip Details:
WHEN: Thursday, April 10, 2014
WHERE: Louisiana’s Barataria Bay and Bay Jimmy, sites that remain oiled from the Gulf oil disaster
WHO: David Muth, Director, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Alisha Renfro, Ph.D., Coastal Scientist, National Wildlife Federation
Erik Johnson, Ph.D., Director of Bird Conservation, Audubon Louisiana
RSVP: To reserve a space, you must RSVP by Monday, April 7 to Emily Guidry Schatzel at 225.253.9781.

Interview Opportunities: If you are unable to make the boat trip on April 10, interview opportunities are available with experts in science, policy, wildlife and restoration issues from our national and local conservation organizations.

Restoration Experts:
David Muth, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Douglas J. Meffert, D. Env., MBA, Executive Director, National Audubon Society (Audubon Louisiana)
Steve Cochran, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund
Simone Maloz, Executive Director, Restore or Retreat

Science:
John A. Lopez, Ph.D., Executive Director, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation
Alisha Renfro, Ph.D., Coastal Scientist, Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation

Policy:
Cynthia Duet, Director of Governmental Relations, National Audubon Society (Audubon Louisiana)
Courtney Taylor, Policy Director, Land, Water & Wildlife Program, Environmental Defense Fund
Sara Gonzalez-Rothi Kronenthal, Senior Policy Specialist, Protecting and Restoring Coasts and Floodplains, National Wildlife Federation

Business Impacts:
Jim Wyerman, Director of Strategic Partnerships & Communications, Environmental Defense Fund

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WHO WE ARE: The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in Houma, New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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Media Advisory for Feb. 20: “Bayou Sundance” Documentary to Premiere in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward

February 14, 2014 | Posted by Delta Dispatches in Community Resiliency, Hurricane Katrina, Media Resources, Meetings/Events

Media Advisory for Thursday, February 20, 2014

Contact: Arthur Johnson, The Lower Ninth Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development, 504.421.9643, ajohnson@sustainthenine.org

“Bayou Sundance” Documentary to Premiere in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward 

Provocative film details history of Bayou Bienvenue through eyes of community elders and youth

Bayou Sundance

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle is a degraded bald cypress swamp just north of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. Over the past 50 years, human activity has caused the swamp and surrounding ecosystem to erode, increasing the city’s vulnerability to storms and contributing to catastrophic damage during Hurricane Katrina.

Through the eyes of community elders and youth, “Bayou Sundance” documents the history of the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle, including the decline of nearby wetlands, resulting impacts and the area’s movement toward rebirth. This powerful story captures the importance of urban wetlands, natural storm protection for coastal cities and serves as a historical environmental justice case study.

You are invited to join us for the premiere of “Bayou Sundance” and to learn more about the future of Bayou Bienvenue and the importance of coastal restoration to both the city of New Orleans and the state. Light dinner will be served.

This film is a product of The Lower Ninth Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development with support from Environmental Defense Fund and National Wildlife Federation.

The trailer can be viewed online here, and the full film will be available starting February 20 at www.restorethebayou.org.

Film Screening and Panel Details:
WHAT: Film screening and Q&A panel with filmmakers and producers

WHEN: Thursday, February 20, 6-7:30 p.m. CT

WHERE: All Soul’s Community Center
5500 St. Claude Avenue
Lower Ninth Ward
New Orleans, LA 70117 ‎

WHO: Arthur Johnson: Executive Director, The Lower Ninth Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development and Producer of "Bayou Sundance"
Happy Johnson: Teacher, Author and Co-Director of "Bayou Sundance"
Amanda Moore: Greater New Orleans Program Manager, National Wildlife Federation

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Conservation Organizations Respond to Senator Mary Landrieu’s Confirmation as Chairwoman of Energy and Natural Resources Committee

February 11, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in BP Oil Disaster, Clean Water Act, Media Resources, RESTORE Act, Senator Mary Landrieu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS: Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org

Conservation Organizations Respond to Senator Mary Landrieu’s Confirmation as Chairwoman of Energy and Natural Resources Committee

Landrieu a champion for Louisiana coastal restoration, Gulf oil spill recovery

(Washington, DC—February 11, 2014) Today, the U.S. Senate Democratic Caucus confirmed Senator Mary Landrieu as chairwoman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. National and local conservation organizations committed to Mississippi River Delta restoration – Environmental Defense FundNational Wildlife FederationNational Audubon SocietyLake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – issued the following statement:

“We are pleased to welcome Senator Mary Landrieu as the new chairwoman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Senator Landrieu has proven herself to be a champion for restoration of the Mississippi River Delta, as well as an effective legislator, notably demonstrated by her leadership in crafting and passing the bipartisan RESTORE Act which benefits the entire Gulf Coast. The law ensures that Clean Water Act fines from the 2010 BP Gulf oil disaster go back to the Gulf Coast states for restoration. This historic legislation would not have become law without Senator Landrieu’s tireless leadership and her ability to work across the aisle. In her new capacity as committee chairwoman, we look forward to a continued partnership to advance both funding and implementation of Mississippi River Delta restoration.”

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The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in Houma, New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.

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Coalition Responds to Garret Graves’ Resignation from Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

February 5, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in Media Resources

PRESS STATEMENT — FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS: Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org

Coalition Responds to Garret Graves’ Resignation from Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

Conservation groups praise vast accomplishments, look to continued leadership

(New Orleans, LA—February 5, 2014) Yesterday, Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) Chairman Garret Graves announced he will resign on February 17. A coalition of leading national and local conservation organizations that work on Mississippi River Delta restoration — Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana — issued the following response:

“The Mississippi River Delta Restoration Coalition extends our immense appreciation to Garret Graves for his tireless work to restore Louisiana’s coast. In the face of multiple hurricanes, tropical storms and the nation’s largest oil disaster, Graves overcame enormous challenges while maintaining ongoing focus to identify solutions that address our big-picture land loss crisis.

“Graves has been an impassioned, effective leader in the fight to reconnect the Mississippi River to its wetlands to create a more sustainable future. Thanks to Graves’ leadership and unanimous legislative support, Louisiana has a Coastal Master Plan in place to deliver the suite of science-based solutions needed to address coastal restoration on a large scale. We wish Graves well in his future endeavors, and we hope he will keep fighting as an invaluable voice for our coast.

“We welcome Jerome Zeringue as new CPRA chairman and look forward to working with him and his team to implement the state’s master plan. The coastal land loss crisis is a battle we can win. With the state’s commitment to coastal restoration, and with diverse partnerships working to secure resources for the future, we look forward to building on Graves’ accomplishments and advancing coastal restoration projects at full speed.”

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The Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Comprised of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in Houma, New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. See more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org.  

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New Evidence of BP Oil Spill Effects Revealed Today

December 18, 2013 | Posted by Elizabeth Skree in BP Oil Disaster, Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS: Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Erin Greeson, National Audubon Society, 503.913.8978, egreeson@audubon.org 

New Evidence of BP Oil Spill Effects Revealed Today

Millions of Pounds of Oily Material Cleaned Up in Recent Weeks, New Study Links Oil to Dolphin Deaths

(New Orleans, LA—December 18, 2013) Today, two new developments linked BP oil from the 2010 Gulf oil disaster to ongoing wildlife, habitat and economic impacts in Louisiana. First, a new peer-reviewed scientific study by a team of government, academic and non-governmental researchers was released linking BP oil from the 2010 Gulf oil disaster to dolphin deaths and illness in Barataria Bay, La., an area that saw heavy oiling during the disaster. Additionally, reports surfaced today that some 1.5 million pounds of “oily material” have been recovered from the coast of Lafourche Parish in the past few weeks.

The dolphin study said that the health effects seen in the Barataria Bay dolphins are not only significant but also will likely lead to reduced survival and ability to reproduce.

The area from which the tar mats were collected spans between Elmer’s Island—home to many species of birds, fish and other species—and Port Fourchon, La., a major economic driver for the Gulf. National Wildlife Federation, Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation released the following joint statement today in response to this news:

“Today’s tragic news of sustained oil-linked dolphin deaths and illness underscores the true state of the Gulf. Additionally, more tar mats full of BP oil have surfaced recently in Louisiana, as they have been doing consistently since the Gulf oil disaster began in April 2010.  

“BP saturates media markets with its pricy ads, but it can’t hide these truths. Instead of continuing the PR onslaught, BP should accept responsibility for all of the harmful impacts it has caused the Gulf’s ecosystems and economies, including long-term impacts that remain unknown. BP should pay up.

“New evidence like this report on Louisiana dolphins and the ongoing discovery of millions of pounds of tar mats in Louisiana are a smoking gun showing that BP’s ads implying that clean-up is over and the Gulf is better than ever are simply not true. The Gulf is still waiting for the realization of restoration that it deserves. The Gulf is still waiting for BP to accept accountability and to make things right.”

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