Archive for Economy


Conservation Groups Commemorate Katrina Anniversary by Urging President to Prioritize Restoration

August 26, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in coastal restoration, Community Resiliency, Economy, Federal Policy, Hurricane Katrina, K10, Media Resources, Restoration Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 Contact:

Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Jacques Hebert, National Audubon Society, 504.264.6849, jhebert@audubon.org
Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225.767.4181, jimmy.frederick@crcl.org
John Lopez, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, 504.421.7348, jlopez@saveourlake.org

Conservation Groups Commemorate Katrina Anniversary by Urging President Obama to Prioritize Restoration 

Coastal Restoration Is Key to City’s Long-Term Resiliency, and Administration Has Opportunities to Advance Efforts

(NEW ORLEANS, LA—Aug. 26, 2015) As President Obama and former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush prepare to visit New Orleans to commemorate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina this week, national and local conservation groups working together on Mississippi River Delta restorationEnvironmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation and Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana – issued the following joint statement:

“In the coming days, President Obama, two former U.S. Presidents and other leaders will honor the thousands of lives lost and bring well-deserved attention to the progress Louisiana and the Gulf Coast have made since the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina a decade ago.

“However, the job here is far from finished. Louisiana’s coastal wetlands – its first line of defense against future storms and a key driver for the health of the Gulf – continue to vanish at the stunning rate of one football field an hour. We look to President Obama to prioritize restoration of Louisiana’s disappearing coast for the remainder of his term and in doing so, leave a legacy of lasting resilience for the region.

“President Obama and leaders across government must maximize the impact of restoration efforts by protecting existing revenue streams for restoration, ensuring that the parties involved are working together effectively and prioritizing funding for large-scale ecosystem projects that will most significantly benefit the region. The pending BP settlement provides a tremendous immediate opportunity to do that, with billions of dollars that can  be dedicated now to the most critical ecosystem projects Gulf-wide, including substantial investments in the Mississippi River Delta.

“This is not just a Louisiana crisis, it’s a regional and national issue: Louisiana’s coast and its communities are powerful economic engines for shipping, energy, seafood and other industries that feed and fuel the nation and support millions of jobs across America.

“Katrina was the wake-up call. We certainly hope the Gulf Coast never has a repeat of that level of devastation. But unless meaningful coastal restoration moves forward and is funded for the long-term, we leave the people, wildlife and industries across the Louisiana coast at immense risk.  And because of the flow of funds resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the President and his Administration have the opportunity to act now, to turn these twin disasters into a positive, lasting and meaningful legacy in the Gulf. “

 

Background:

  • On July 2, 2015, the U.S. Department of Justice and BP announced an agreement in principle on a global settlement that will resolve all remaining federal and state litigation relating to BP’s role in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon offshore oil disaster. BP will pay a total of $18.732 billion to settle these claims with $7.332 billion designated for Natural Resource Damages (in addition to the $1 billion BP already paid for early restoration efforts), $5.5 billion in Clean Water Act penalties and $5.9 billion will cover economic damages to states and localities on the Gulf Coast. For more information on the agreement in principle, click here.
  • If the agreement in principle with BP becomes final, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, an independent federal entity established by the RESTORE Act, will have more than $1 billion dollars to dedicate to critical ecosystem restoration projects across the Gulf in the near-term.
  • Additionally, the Louisiana Coastal Area Program (LCA) represents another opportunity to construct large-scale ecosystem projects that increase coastal resilience. The Administration has requested U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) funding for the Louisiana Coastal Area Program (LCA) in previous years, and Fiscal Year 2017 is an opportune time to refocus on this critical program to maximize synergies with RESTORE Act funding and increase the overall impact of coastal restoration efforts in Louisiana.

 

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Restore the Mississippi River Delta Launches “Restore the Coast” Community Engagement Campaign

August 14, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in coastal restoration, Community Resiliency, Economy, Media Resources, Restoration Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                  

Contact:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Jacques Hebert, National Audubon Society, 504.264.6849, jhebert@audubon.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225.317.2046, jimmy.frederick@crcl.org

Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition Launches “Restore the Coast” Community Engagement Campaign

Campaign Highlights Important Role Louisiana Leaders Play in Coastal Restoration

(August 14, 2015 – NEW ORLEANS) This weekend, the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is launching the “Restore the Coast” community engagement campaign to highlight the important role Louisiana’s elected officials play in coastal restoration. This multifaceted, nonpartisan education campaign will begin by asking voters to sign a pledge urging leaders to: be a voice for coastal restoration, protect existing and secure future coastal restoration funding, and support Louisiana’s Coastal Master Plan.

The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition – made up of national and local organizations working on coastal Louisiana restoration, including Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation – released the following statement announcing the new campaign:

“The ‘Restore the Coast’ campaign’s goal is to demonstrate the importance of coastal restoration as a central issue for all candidates. Its initial step will be to encourage Louisiana residents to do two things – pledge to vote, and urge elected officials to be a voice for coastal restoration, so our communities are better protected from hurricanes, floodwaters and other disasters. We believe that Louisiana needs leaders who protect existing and secure future coastal restoration funding and support the state’s Coastal Master Plan, so our future can be safeguarded through long-lasting, science-based coastal restoration projects.

“Our hope is to send a clear message to our public officials: Louisianians want leaders who will prioritize coastal restoration, by keeping restoration dollars for restoration and continuing the forward progress made through the coastal master planning process. Together, we can protect our communities and coast for generations to come.”

The “Restore the Coast” campaign includes television and radio commercials, billboards, print ads, tabling at local community events, as well as interactive street activities to engage the public and encourage social sharing of this important issue facing Louisiana. Learn more about the “Restore the Coast” campaign and pledge by visiting RestoreTheCoast.org.

Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is a joint effort of non-profit organizations made up of science, public policy, economics and outreach experts working collaboratively to raise awareness and build support for science-based solutions to restore Louisiana’s coast. The coalition is comprised of staff experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation. Together, they are working to restore Louisiana’s coast through long-lasting, science-based restoration solutions, as identified in the state’s Coastal Master Plan. Of the projects included in the Coastal Master Plan, they have identified a suite of 19 priority restoration projects that will collectively and drastically reduce wetland loss and help protect New Orleans and other coastal communities from the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. Learn more at MississippiRiverDelta.org and RestoreTheCoast.org.

 

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Vote Now: Which Coastal Restoration Slogan Should Appear on Dirty Coast Products?

July 30, 2015 | Posted by jhebert in Community Resiliency, Economics, Economy, Hurricanes, Job Creation, K10, Restoration Projects, Wildlife tourism

bird

Earlier this month, we put out a call for coastal restoration slogans that could be made into a design to be featured on Dirty Coast t-shirts and other products. We received an overwhelming response of more than 200 highly-creative submissions, making our job of selecting which to feature extremely difficult. So much so that we chose five finalists instead of the originally planned three.

They are: 

  1. The World Needs More Louisiana
  2. Greaux the Delta, Greaux Our Home
  3. Save the Boot
  4. Let the River Run Through It
  5. Keep LAND in Our Wetlands

So, we need YOU to help us decide. Vote here for your favorite slogan today through Thursday August 6.

The slogan receiving the most votes will be made into a design that Dirty Coast will place on t-shirts and other products sold in stores and online over the next year. A portion of sale proceeds will go to the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition to help us educate and engage people about the need for coastal restoration. The person who submits the winning slogan will receive a $200 gift card to Dirty Coast, second place will receive a $100 gift card, and third place a $50 card. All three finalists will receive a coastal tour led by experts in coastal restoration.

We’ll announce the winning slogan and unveil the design at a launch party and happy hour on August 20 at 6 p.m. at Dirty Coast’s new Marigny location (2121 Chartres Street, New Orleans, LA).

We hope to see you there!

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We're Partnering with Dirty Coast to Feature YOUR Coastal Restoration Message!

July 13, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in Community Resiliency, Economics, Economy, Hurricane Katrina, Hurricanes, K10, Meetings/Events, People, Restoration Projects

As we approach the 10th anniversaries of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita – a time when we all learned about the importance of the Louisiana coast as a first line of defense against storms – Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition and Dirty Coast are partnering to feature YOUR coastal restoration messages on t-shirts, bags, posters and other snazzy products that will be sold in Dirty Coast’s New Orleans stores and across the web to help raise awareness and support for Louisiana coastal restoration.

Louisiana continues to lose a football field of land every hour, and our state has lost 1,900 square miles of land since the 1930s. These wetlands are crucial to protecting our homes and communities from the effects of hurricanes and storm surge. Without action, we stand to lose another 1,000 square miles by 2050. We want to engage people locally and nationally to understand just how important our coast is to the long-term resiliency of southern Louisiana and the entire nation that depends on our region.

That’s where YOU come in! We want to hear YOUR ideas for coastal restoration slogans! The creative wizzes at Dirty Coast are looking for slogans to use to create designs they’ll place on products to educate people around the world about how badly we need our coast restored now.

How It’s Going Down:

  • Submit as many ideas or slogans as you like here from now through July 23, 2015.
  • After July 23, we’ll select the best THREE slogans that most closely align with the positive messages of coastal restoration and have the best potential to make rad t-shirt designs.
  • We'll let YOU vote for the slogan you want to see designed into a t-shirt and other products.
  • The first place slogan will be made into a design Dirty Coast will sell year-round on t-shirts and other products to raise funds for restoration efforts. The person who submits the winning design will receive a $200 gift card to Dirty Coast, second place will receive a $100 gift card, and 3rd place a $50 gift card.
  • We’ll announce the winning design at a launch party on August 20 at Dirty Coast’s new Marigny location (2121 Chartres Street).
  • The winning design will be featured and sold in Dirty Coast stores and online over the next year, with a portion of sale proceeds going to the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition to help educate and engage people about the need for coastal restoration.

Some Tips to Help You Out:

  • Keep it positive: Our situation is grave, but we want to feature positive, proactive messages that convey that solutions are possible Some questions to get your creative juices flowing:
    • What does the Louisiana coast mean to you?
    • Why is it important that the Louisiana coast be restored?
    • How would you explain coastal restoration to a kindergartener?
    • Why is it important that we act now to restore the coast?
  • Keep it simple: The message needs to be easily understood, engaging and memorable.
  • Keep it fun: In case you’re not familiar with Dirty Coast designs, they’re clever, fun and captivating. See some of their designs here for inspiration.

What’s In It for You?

  • Prizes: The person who submits the winning design will receive a $200 gift card to Dirty Coast, second place will receive a $100 gift card, and 3rd place a $50 gift card.
  • Glory: Your winning message will be proudly worn by coastal warriors around the country for generations come, to spread the message of Louisiana coastal restoration.
  • Pride: You can tell your grandkids that you had a hand in the fight to save our coast.

What more reasons do you need? Now get to work unleashing your creative genius to save the coast! Submit your ideas here. We can’t wait to see the results.

Questions? Email jhebert@audubon.org

About Dirty Coast: Dirty Coast began in 2004 as a response to what was passing for local apparel on Bourbon street; a way to make cool designs for die hard New Orleanians. Small batches of shirts and posters. A fun side project. In 2005, a Category 3 storm made its way through the area without causing too much damage. Then the federal infrastructure meant to protect the city failed and filled New Orleans with water. Soon after, Blake found himself in Lafayette with all his plans placed on hold. While in exile, meditating on this fate of his beloved city, Blake designed a bumper sticker that read, “Be a New Orleanian, Wherever You Are.” He printed 5,000, and placed them all over New Orleans as soon as he could return. The reaction to Blake's design was overwhelming, and developing the Dirty Coast brand became a no-brainer. Why T-shirts? Because they are the great equalizer. You can have a good design. You can have fun, cheeky copy. But to create a shirt that exists on a level beyond your standard laundry, that engages your friends and neighbors in conversation, that starts debates, that elicits laughter, nostalgia, and many “Yea Ya Right!” That’s what we’re trying to do. To be bold and to be real about our dirty, marvelous city. Everything we do, everything we make is a proclamation of our love for New Orleans. And when you truly love something, you want to share it with as many people as possible. So whether you’re born here, a transplant, or simply passing through, you can be a New Orleanian wherever you are.

About Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition: The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is working to protect people, wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands. As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss, we offer science-based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration. Composed of conservation, policy, science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Washington, D.C.; and around the United States. Learn more at www.mississippiriverdelta.org and connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Wine & Wetlands event brings together coastal residents, advocates

January 28, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in Community Resiliency, Economy, Meetings/Events

Guest post by Mike Mariana, Belle Chasse, LA

Full Room Standing

Wine & Wetlands event at the Woodland Plantation

On January 15, my wife and I attended the Wine & Wetlands event organized by the Restore the Mississippi River Delta coalition and their outreach coordinator for Plaquemines Parish, Philip Russo. More than 50 people from across our parish attended and had the opportunity to hear from several concerned citizens, business owners and governmental representatives, all working in their own way to restore our coast.

Thanks to the sponsorship of several of Plaquemines Parish’s concerned business leaders, all who attended the Wine & Wetlands event at the Woodland Plantation also enjoyed excellent hospitality. The food and spirits helped create a relaxed atmosphere where friends, both old and new, could discuss coastal restoration and the future of our parish.

One thing was clear: Unless we develop significant federal, state and local resources, and follow a solid plan, our parish and our way of life will be literally washed away.

I look forward to many future community activities as we continue to make more people aware of the need for coastal restoration. This is a broad geographical and multi-generational fight, and we have been passed the baton. It is now our jobs to educate the activists of the future and hold government and private-sector organizations accountable for coastal restoration projects on the books now. Please join us.

Regards,

Mike Mariana

Belle Chasse, LA

Stay connected with Restore the Mississippi River Delta by following us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!

Group Photo

MRD Coalition members at Wine & Wetlands

Mike at Bayou Dupont

Mike at Bayou Dupont

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NEWS RELEASE: Louisiana Governor Cuts Coastal Funds, Jeopardizing Coast

January 22, 2015 | Posted by lbourg in Economy, Media Resources

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org
Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org
Lauren Bourg, National Audubon Society, 225.776.9838, lbourg@audubon.org
Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225.767.4181, jimmy.frederick@crcl.org

Louisiana Governor Cuts Coastal Funds, Jeopardizing Coast

Budget cuts will impact restoration programs and raises question of how state will pay for Coastal Plan

(New Orleans – January 21, 2015) On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal announced budget cuts including cuts to Louisiana coastal programs and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Agency (CPRA).

National and local conservation organizations committed to coastal Louisiana restoration – Environmental Defense Fund, National Wildlife Federation, National Audubon Society and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana  issued the following statement in response to announced budget cuts:

“In 2012 the Governor and legislature of the State of Louisiana embarked upon a fifty-year, $50 billion effort to avert a disaster for more than two million of our coastal citizens.  To date the state has managed to shield the agency leading that effort, CPRA, from budgetary politics. CPRA manages hundreds of millions of dollars in levee and restoration construction projects each year and is run on a small budget entirely supported by mineral revenues—nothing from the taxpayer-supported general fund.

“Clearly, Louisiana is facing a short term budgetary crisis, but CPRA is tackling a much more serious long- term crisis. If we lose the fight against the forces of coastal erosion, we lose our homes, our coastal towns and cities, our jobs, and we devastate our local and national economy. We are in the very early stages of developing the long-term strategies we’ll need to fund the plan—and we have a long way to go. In the meantime, cutting CPRA’s restoration and protection program support is short-sighted and ill-advised.

“Louisiana’s coastal region is an economic driver for the state and the front lines in protecting our state from storms and the encroaching Gulf of Mexico. Today’s budget cuts diminish the CPRA’s ability to do its job, putting communities at risk and slowing down restoration efforts.  These cuts are an unfortunate attempt to hastily balance a budget while potentially having lasting impacts on our coastal economy and safety of coastal residents.

“As the state begins to implement a fifty-year, $50 billion coastal master plan, now is not the time to be cutting funds from the coastal program. On the contrary, the governor and legislature should instead be laying out a vision for what new sources of funding will pay for this critical plan.

We look forward to working with this governor and future governors to protect our coast and develop new, long-term funding sources that can be used to implement the state’s coastal master plan.”

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Interview Opportunities: Interview opportunities are available with experts in coastal restoration and budget issues from our national and local conservation organizations.

Mississippi River Delta Restoration Experts:
David Muth, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, National Wildlife Federation
Douglas J. Meffert, D. Env., MBA, Executive Director, National Audubon Society (Audubon Louisiana)
Kimberly Reyher, Executive Director, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana
Steve Cochran, Director for Mississippi River Delta Restoration, Environmental Defense Fund

 

 

 

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New Website Tracks Impacts of Coastal Restoration On Businesses and the Gulf Economy

September 18, 2014 | Posted by Ryan Rastegar in Economy, Media Resources

Visit OurCoastOurEconomy.org

This post originally appeared on the website OurCoastOurEconomy.org.

Environmental Defense Fund today launched a new business-focused website, OurCoastOurEconomy.org, which provides comprehensive information and data on the direct links between Louisiana coastal restoration and the survival and growth of business sectors in the state, Gulf region and nation.

The website offers resources on the economics of restoration, policy updates on the RESTORE Act and other restoration funding, a map of businesses poised to grow with increased funding for coastal restoration, news updates and reports.

Who would find this website helpful?

  • Business leaders who care about making sure RESTORE monies get spent as intended.
  • Policymakers interested in the types and locations of business that will benefit from restoration.
  • Reporters following the RESTORE Act and covering why it matters to businesses.

If you are a supporter and advocate of coastal restoration, you will find this site useful for messaging and talking points. Be sure to check out the news section where, for instance, you can learn that the long-awaited Treasury regulations for the RESTORE Act have recently been issued and that an important new ruling has been issued in the BP oil spill trial. If you are a business involved in coastal restoration, you will find out about important tools like the state's Hot List, which tracks the status on current projects and projects under development.

What will you find?

The site contains many useful resources – in plain English – about the crisis of coastal land loss in Louisiana, what's happening with implementation of the federal RESTORE Act and the status of related funding streams available for Louisiana coastal restoration. For example, site visitors may be interested in:

How can you help?

We always need business leaders willing to speak out in support of restoration, be available for media interviews, write letters to the editor or participate in key meetings. If you want to help, we can loop you into what's happening. Contact us or sign up for monthly updates.

You can also help by telling others about this new website by:

  • Emailing a link to your network and business contacts
  • Sample tweet:

Coastal land loss is not only bad for the environment — it's bad for the economy. To learn more, visit www.ourcoastoureconomy.org

  • Sample Facebook post:

Coastal wetlands in Louisiana are disappearing at the rate of a football field of land every hour. This land loss threatens our communities as well as thousands of businesses and jobs along the Gulf Coast. To learn more about what can be done, visit www.ourcoastoureconomy.org.

If you are a business, please cruise around the site and let us know if it's helpful, or what would make it more useful for your business purposes. To contribute content or get more information, contactjwyerman@edf.org.

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GNO, Inc. announces launch of Coalition for Coastal Resilience and Economy

July 15, 2014 | Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Economy, Job Creation

By Elizabeth Skree, Communications Manager, Environmental Defense Fund

Last Friday, Greater New Orleans, Inc. (GNO, Inc.) announced the launch of the Coalition for Coastal Resilience and Economy (CCRE). CCRE is a coalition of Louisiana businesses and business leaders who are advocating for sustainable restoration of Louisiana’s disappearing coastal wetlands, deltas, rivers and coastline. This new business coalition will support an integrated three-legged framework of coastal restoration, appropriate structural flood mitigation and non-structural flood mitigation. The group includes representatives from a wide variety of business and industry sectors including banking, energy, real estate, entertainment, communications, navigation and manufacturing.

1280px-USACE_New_Orleans_skyline

Photo credit: Michael Maples, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Via U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Digital Visual Library

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost nearly 1,900 square miles of wetlands, and the state continues losing land at the rate of one football field every hour. This loss is attributed to a host of causes, including oil and gas exploration, leveeing of the Mississippi River, hurricanes, coastal erosion and subsidence.

Louisiana's land loss crisis is not just an environmental problem – it is an economic crisis. Industries, businesses and communities in Louisiana depend on the delta for protection from storms and for a sustainable future. Thankfully, there are solutions to address and resolve this land loss crisis. And just as many causes contribute to Louisiana's land loss problem, it will take a combination of scientific solutions to resolve it.

Restoring the Mississippi River Delta will not only restore thousands of acres of protective wetlands and habitat, but it will also protect Louisiana businesses, cities and infrastructure. It will also create new and sustain existing jobs in the region. Find out more about how coastal restoration protects industries and creates economic growth at ourcoastoureconomy.org.

CCRE’s mission is to:

  • Promote the business case for coastal restoration in Louisiana
  • Maximize RESTORE Act funding and other federal funds that are allocated to Louisiana
  • Ensure that RESTORE Act funding and other federal funds are spent on their intended purposes
  • Leverage RESTORE Act funding and other federal funding to direct other revenue streams
  • Create opportunities to engage local businesses and workforce in implementation

“Water is the existential issue for Southeast Louisiana,” said Michael Hecht, President & CEO of Greater New Orleans, Inc. “Our region has a take-it-or-leave-it opportunity to make strategic investments in the environment today that will ensure continued economic growth and opportunity tomorrow, and CCRE will help ensure this happens.”

“Partnerships such as these allow the state to engage business interests and other stakeholders so that we can work together to achieve our goals of restoring and protecting this valuable resource, coastal Louisiana,” said Jerome Zeringue, Executive Director of the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority.

CCRE is composed of a diverse group of CEOs and executives from the Greater New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Terrebonne-Lafourche regions. Members include:

  • Marty Mayer, President & CEO, Stirling Properties (CCRE Chair)
  • Justin Augustine, Regional Vice President, Veolia
  • Dale Benoit, Owner, Print-­‐All, Inc.
  • Rita Benson LeBlanc, Owner/Vice Chairman of the Board of the New Orleans Saints and Pelicans
  • Sharon Bergeron, Vice President of Commercial Lending, Coastal Commerce Bank
  • Donna Fraiche, Founding Member of Baker Donelson’s Louisiana offices, Former Board Member of the Louisiana Recovery Authority
  • Fran Gladden, Vice President of Government and Public Affairs, Cox Communications Southeast Region
  • Philip Gunn, Managing Director of New Orleans Office, Postlethwaite & Netterville
  • Will Hales, Assistant Vice President, Iberia Bank
  • Tara Hernandez, President, JCH Development
  • Merritt Lane, President & CEO, Canal Barge Company, Inc.
  • Jay Lapeyre, CEO, Laitram, LLC
  • G.F. Gay Le Breton, Managing Director, Chaffe & Associates
  • Brandon Nelson, Vice President of Commercial Banking, Whitney Bank
  • Mark Spansel, Partner, Adams & Reese
  • Lizette Terral, President, New Orleans Region, JP Morgan Chase Bank
  • Mickey Thomas, President & CEO, South Louisiana Bank
  • Brent Wood, State Government Affairs Manager, Chevron

“As a business leader in a coastal community, I believe it is critical to safeguard our current and future assets so that we can continue to expand and grow our businesses with confidence,” Sharon Bergeron, Vice President of Commercial Lending, Coastal Commerce Bank. “Yet while protection of our current economy is paramount, Southeast Louisiana is also in a unique position to expand our expertise of coastal restoration and export this specialized knowledge to new regions, thereby creating new jobs and new industries for Louisiana firms and residents.”

More information on the Coalition for Coastal Resilience and Economy can be found here: http://gnoinc.org/news/publications/press-release/gno-inc-announces-coalition-for-coastal-resilience-and-economy/.

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Gulf Tourism Depends on a Healthy Gulf

July 9, 2013 | Posted by Rachel Schott in Economy, Hunting and Fishing, Latest News, Media Resources, Reports, Seafood, Wildlife, Wildlife tourism

PRESS RELEASE

Contacts:
Molly Moore, Sanderson Strategies Group, 202.682.3700, molly@sandersonstrategies.com
Elizabeth Skree, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, eskree@edf.org

Gulf Tourism Depends on a Healthy Gulf

New report shows wildlife tourism is central to Gulf Coast economy

(New Orleans—July 9, 2013) The coastal environment of the Gulf of Mexico supports a $19 billion annual wildlife tourism industry that is highly dependent on critical investments in coastal environmental restoration, according to a survey released today by Datu Research LLC.

Wildlife Tourism and the Gulf Coast Economy” concludes that wildlife tourism is extremely valuable to the Gulf Coast economy and relies heavily on the health of the endangered Gulf Coast ecosystem in the five states of Louisiana, Florida, Texas, Alabama and Mississippi. Wildlife tourism includes recreational fishing, hunting and wildlife watching.

Key findings of the report show that wildlife tourism:

  • Generates more than $19 billion in annual spending.
  • Attracts 20 million participants annually across the five Gulf Coast states.
  • Delivers $5.3 billion annually in federal, state and tax revenues.

The study also found tourism jobs can account for 20-36 percent of all private jobs in coastal counties and parishes that are particularly dependent on wildlife activities. Those 53 counties and parishes have more than 25,000 tourism-related businesses and nearly 500,000 associated jobs.

The study reported that all forms of tourism generate 2.6 million jobs in the Gulf states, nearly five times the number of jobs provided by the region’s other three largest resource-based industries: commercial fishing, oil and gas, and shipping.

“With so many outdoor adventure opportunities, tourism is a critical industry to our coastal parishes,” Louisiana Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne said. “Sportsman’s Paradise is more than our state’s nickname. If Louisiana is to remain the Sportsman’s Paradise, we have to ensure that funds Louisiana receives as a result of the Deepwater Horizon spill are properly and wisely spent preserving our paradise.”

Lt. Gov. Dardenne will speak at a press conference Tuesday, July 9 in New Orleans along with Billy Nungesser, president, Plaquemines Parish; Charlotte Randolph, president, Lafourche Parish; John F. Young, Jr., president, Jefferson Parish; Capt. Ryan Lambert, owner, Cajun Fishing Adventures; Mark Romig, president, New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation; Alon Shaya, executive chef, Domenica, Besh Restaurant Group; and Marcy Lowe, president, Datu Research LLC.

The study’s findings underscore the direct connection between the health of the ecosystem and the economic health of the Gulf region and the urgency for using the pending influx of monies from the RESTORE Act and other payments resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill to properly and effectively restore the fragile Gulf Coast ecosystems.

“The conservation solutions that last are the ones that make economic sense and consider the needs of local communities,” said Scott Burns, director of the environment program at the Walton Family Foundation, which helped fund the survey. “This study connects the dots between a healthy Gulf environment, abundant wildlife and the good jobs that depend on tourism. This report adds to the growing evidence that investing in real restoration in the Gulf is the best way to create jobs and build economic prosperity across the region.”

Datu Research LLC is an economic research firm whose principals were part of the Duke University Center on Globalization, Governance & Competitiveness. They have previously released three analyses of supply chains associated with the work of coastal restoration, showing that more than 400 businesses in 36 states would benefit from such work.

This study was funded by Environmental Defense Fund with support from the Walton Family Foundation.

Part II: Supporting comments

Comments from participants in release of study: Wildlife Tourism and the Gulf Coast Economy

John Young, president, Jefferson Parish: “This study further supports the direct link between a healthy coastal environment and a robust economy which depends on a $19 billion wildlife tourism industry. The well-being and continued growth of our coastal communities depend on the health of the Gulf, restoring and strengthening our fragile ecosystems, and promoting a wildlife tourism industry which can thrive, not only in Jefferson Parish but in all Gulf Coast states.”

Billy Nungesser, president, Plaquemines Parish: “Plaquemines Parish and Louisiana are the nation’s premier delta coastline. We are strategically positioned as the fishing capital of the world, the sportsmen’s paradise state and the seafood capital of the United States, and these factors which make Plaquemines and Louisiana unique depend on the health of our coast.”

Michael Hecht, president & CEO, Greater New Orleans, Inc.:  “Tourism overall, including wildlife tourism, provides 2.6 million jobs across the Gulf States – and many of these are with small businesses. To protect this vital economic base, as well as other important coastal industries, we must prioritize large-scale coastal restoration projects that will ensure a stable coast and healthy environment.”

Mark Romig, president,  New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation: “New Orleans attracts the experiential discover type of tourist, one who enjoys using the city as a base to go out and explore any authentic and unique aspects of the city and region, including the natural world. For the many businesses in this region, the need to restore and preserve our coastal wetlands is not optional; it’s an urgent economic necessity.”

Capt. Ryan Lambert, owner, Cajun Fishing Adventures: “I’ve grown up loving and making a living from the waters of the Louisiana coast and for more than 30 years, my business has been taking people fishing in those waters. But every year, as I see places disappearing from the map, I fear I may be part of the last generation to live off the water.”

Ralph Brennan, president, Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group: “Family restaurants like mine depend on a healthy Gulf Coast for the fresh seafood that has made New Orleans the culinary capital of the United States. The money states are beginning to receive to repair the damages from the Deepwater Horizon spill are our best – and may be our last real chance – to reverse decades of mistakes.”

Marcy Lowe, president, Datu Research LLC.: “This study shows the vital connection between the health of the ecosystem and the economic health of the Gulf region. Wildlife tourism is a major contributor to the Gulf Coast economy, but it’s very survival depends on the restoration of an endangered and irreplaceable ecosystem.”

Part III: Key study findings

Report: Wildlife Tourism and the Gulf Coast Economy

Key findings for the Gulf region

Wildlife Tourism and the Gulf Coast Economy,” a survey produced by Datu Research LLC, finds that in the five Gulf Coast states:

  • Tourism generates 2.6 million jobs, nearly five times the number of jobs created by the region’s other three largest resource-based industries combined: commercial fishing, oil and gas, and shipping.
  • In Gulf Coast coastal counties and parishes where economies are particularly dependent on tourism, 20-36 percent of all private sector employment is tourism-related.
  • Wildlife tourism, which includes wildlife watching, recreational fishing and hunting, generates more than $19 billion in annual spending.
  • Wildlife tourism generates $5.3 billion annually in federal, state and local tax revenues, divided roughly equally between local and state tax revenues and federal revenues. In 2011, Gulf Coast state and local governments received $2.5 billion and the federal government $2.8 billion from wildlife tourism. Recreational fishing generates the highest amount of tax revenue at $2.2 billion followed by $2 billion from wildlife watching and $1.2 billion from hunting.
  • Wildlife tourism attracts 20 million participants annually across the five Gulf Coast states. The wildlife tourism industry consists not only of wildlife guide businesses that directly serve wildlife tourists, but also the lodging and dining establishments where they eat and sleep.
  • Gulf Coast tourism – and wildlife tourism in particular – is highly dependent on a healthy coastal environment.
  • More than 11,000 lodging and dining establishments and 1,100 guide and outfitters businesses create business networks that depend on each other for referrals. In a survey of over 500 guide and outfitter businesses, about 40 percent of respondents said clients ask them for hotel recommendations and 55 percent said clients request restaurant recommendations. Likewise, more than 60 percent of guide businesses receive clients based on recommendations from hotels and restaurants.
  • Guide and outfitting operations represent a strong network of small businesses that have a large impact on local tourism. More than 86 percent of these businesses have one to five employees, and nearly 60 percent host more than 200 visitors per year, with many hosting several thousand.

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New online content illustrates economic benefits of environmental restoration

July 31, 2012 | Posted by Delta Dispatches in Economy, Job Creation, RESTORE Act

Did you know that coastal restoration helps not just the environment but also the economy? Restoration activities, like the construction of sediment diversions, coastal dredging and barrier island restoration, directly create jobs through the firms hired to carry out the projects.

Additionally, Louisiana’s coast supports a $34 billion tourism industry, 33 percent of our nation’s seafood harvest, 10 of our 15 largest ports and 90 percent of our offshore crude oil and natural gas production.1 Coastal restoration protects these industries by keeping ecosystems intact and protecting and restoring the natural barriers against storm surge and other natural disasters.

Here at the Mississippi River Delta Restoration Campaign, we are committed to highlighting how restoring the Gulf Coast will not only rejuvenate an ailing ecosystem but also create new jobs and revitalize the gulf’s economy – an environmental and economic win-win.

Recently, economists with Environmental Defense Fund and Duke University have identified how coastal restoration provides quadruple economic returns by supporting jobs in multiple sectors. To better break this down, we have built a suite of Web pages called “Building a Restoration Economy” to show the different areas where jobs can be created:

A healthy coastal ecosystem is vital for the gulf’s economy and has the potential to create thousands of jobs in new, high-paying sectors, and with the recent passage of both the Louisiana 2012 Coastal Master Plan and the RESTORE Act, large-scale restoration will come sooner rather than later. For an ailing economy and wounded ecosystem, this is great news.

To learn more about our how coastal restoration provides quadruple economic returns, visit “Building a Restoration Economy.”

Map: Relevant U.S. employee locations of firms linked to Gulf Coast restoration projects

  1. http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/files/2012/07/CGGC_Gulf-Coast-Restoration.pdf
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